Search Engine Watch
SEO News

Go Back   Search Engine Watch Forums > General Search Issues > Search Technology & Relevancy
FAQ Members List Calendar Forum Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-06-2004   #1
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation On-Topic Analysis

Hello, everyone.
Back to business since the last hurricane!

I have published the results of experiment #1. Thanks to all participants for their help and input. The entire documentation can be read at http://www.miislita.com/exp1/on-topic-analysis.html

I changed the title of the exp to reflect more accurately the theory and purposes behind the research. The new title is

ON-TOPIC ANALYSIS - Online Discovery of On-Topic Terms

The paper discusses a procedure for the online discovery of on-topic terms. Discovery is based on occurrence and co-occurrence information. It is demonstrated that on-topic analysis is a valuable tool for enabling users to enhance the semantics of theme sites and concept-focused documents. Specific applications to search engine marketing strategies and information retrieval systems are presented.

This is a long work involving competitive queries submitted by professional search engine marketing specialists. It introduces a methodology and procedure called on-topic analysis, which allows users to discover top, broader, narrower, and optimum terms. The notion of term distances is also presented.

EXPANSION CONCEPTS (LOCAL CONTEXT ANALYSIS)

The paper briefly discusses other techniques, in particular Local Context Analysis (LCA). LCA includes standard theories such as term co-occurrence theory, a novel tf*idf approach, and the notion of expansion concepts (also known as document concepts). I am opening another thread about LCA for those interested in discussing the notion of document concepts at this SEW thread http://forums.searchenginewatch.com/...ead.php?t=2030

Let's discuss On-Topic Analysis!

Orion

Last edited by Nacho : 10-07-2004 at 12:56 AM. Reason: corrected link url
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #2
Nacho
 
Nacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: La Jolla, CA
Posts: 1,382
Nacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to behold
Thumbs up

The experiment, analysis and report are fascinating. Congratulations on a great job! I always learn something new from you every time you make a new communication like this, thank you.

Now, let me get my head together and post something soon. It's kind of late here to do it today.

Saludos!
Nacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #3
fathom
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 475
fathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by orion
Hello, everyone.
Back to business since the last hurricane!

I have published the results of experiment #1. Thanks to all participants for their help and input. The entire documentation can be read at http://www.miislita.com/exp1/on-topic-analysis.html

I changed the title of the exp to reflect more accurately the theory and purposes behind the research. The new title is

ON-TOPIC ANALYSIS - Online Discovery of On-Topic Terms

The paper discusses a procedure for the online discovery of on-topic terms. Discovery is based on occurrence and co-occurrence information. It is demonstrated that on-topic analysis is a valuable tool for enabling users to enhance the semantics of theme sites and concept-focused documents. Specific applications to search engine marketing strategies and information retrieval systems are presented.

This is a long work involving competitive queries submitted by professional search engine marketing specialists. It introduces a methodology and procedure called on-topic analysis, which allows users to discover top, broader, narrower, and optimum terms. The notion of term distances is also presented.

EXPANSION CONCEPTS (LOCAL CONTEXT ANALYSIS)

The paper briefly discusses other techniques, in particular Local Context Analysis (LCA). LCA includes standard theories such as term co-occurrence theory, a novel tf*idf approach, and the notion of expansion concepts (also known as document concepts). I am opening another thread about LCA for those interested in discussing the notion of document concepts at this SEW thread http://forums.searchenginewatch.com/...ead.php?t=2030

Let's discuss On-Topic Analysis!

Orion
Excellent work Orion!

One thought to expand on... and using your example:

mexican food > mexican recipes > tortillas, burritos…

The thrust of the paper is improving page/link "On Topic" relationships.

I would tend to believe that the top hierarchy would be Mexican and food (as in Mexican Food) would be another relationship tree (possibly a historcial archive of the food style).

In this manner two new opportunities of expansion present themselves:

1. Interlinking of "on topic" pages,

2. Expansion into other Mexican on topical trees

e.g. Culture, Language, War/History

Back at your original dialogue the support provided by mexican food to mexican recipes - I would think would be somewhat diluted where mexican to mexican recipes would be complemetary.

Your thoughts?
fathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #4
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Quote:
Originally Posted by fathom
Excellent work Orion!

One thought to expand on... and using your example:

mexican food > mexican recipes > tortillas, burritos…

The thrust of the paper is improving page/link "On Topic" relationships.

I would tend to believe that the top hierarchy would be Mexican and food (as in Mexican Food) would be another relationship tree (possibly a historcial archive of the food style).

In this manner two new opportunities of expansion present themselves:

1. Interlinking of "on topic" pages,

2. Expansion into other Mexican on topical trees

e.g. Culture, Language, War/History

Back at your original dialogue the support provided by mexican food to mexican recipes - I would think would be somewhat diluted where mexican to mexican recipes would be complemetary.

Your thoughts?
Hi, Fathom

Thank for the input. True that any diagram should lead to different possibilities.

First, the selection of mexican food was based on Nacho's submitted query as participant of the study.

Second, our software indicates that recipes is an optimum term for the query mexican food; i.e. it appears near the top of both search- and ranking-based Pi values.

Regards.
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #5
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Oops. Sorry. I forget to include Pi values for Google Keyword Tool for the mexican food query. Here are just the most top results.

UNIQUE TERMS:157 TOTAL TERMS:600
N=GOOGLE QUERY:MEXICAN FOOD

Ri Pi (%) TERMi
1 32.50 MEXICAN
2 32.50 FOOD
3 1.50 RECIPES
4 0.83 HISTORY

Compare these with Table 1. The term recipes is found near the top of the search-based Pi lists. Since recipes is also found near the top of results extracted from the top N titles, it is considered a candidate optimum term. Interestingly to Fathom well-deserved credit, the term history also shows.

Orion
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #6
fathom
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 475
fathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by orion
Hi, Fathom

Thank for the input. True that any diagram should lead to different possibilities.

First, the selection of mexican food was based on Nacho's submitted query as participant of the study.

Second, our software indicates that recipes is an optimum term for the query mexican food; i.e. it appears near the top of both search- and ranking-based Pi values.

Regards.
Understood and not discrediting the work - it's exceptional.

From a "search" topical vantage-point and using conscious or even a subconscious searching habits - there would be a market segregation that plays a part in topic relevancy.

Ranking ability via on topic algorithimic analysis still plays second chair to a searchers appreciation of being on topic.

Tabular results as in output from Wordtracker or Google KW Tool (as an examples) often biases intial observations based on incomplete profiling information

(Illustration only) A query of mexican recipes is quite different to a query for mexican food... the former assumes "making it" as in specifics possibly a hierachical query for ingredients, the latter would normall assume "consuming it" as in specifics possibly a hierachical query for prepared foods, restaurants, or possibly general informative dialogue.

From a commercial vantage point one might assume product sales vs. services segregation and taking this a step further a niche portal developed in this manner could possibily affect negative sales trends or imbalance in sales e.g. why buy prepared if I can make it cheaper.

I guess my only point is taking pure math & science conclusions and attempting to figure out how to visualize real world applications particularly in a commercial environment.

Again - excellent work!

Last edited by fathom : 10-07-2004 at 12:48 PM.
fathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #7
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Hi, Fathom.

Your observations are extremely important and well put.

I found this two statement the reason why a complete approach must be considered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fathom
Ranking ability via on topic algorithimic analysis still plays second chair to a searchers appreciation of being on topic.

Tabular results as in output from Wordtracker or Google KW Tool (as an examples) often biases intial observations based on incomplete profiling information
Ranking only or search stats only (Google, KW, WordTracker) are incomplete approaches to the process of on-topic keyword discovery. The first one is indeed second chair and the other can be indeed biased.

A complete approach as we presented, e.g. proper identification of optimum terms can be achieved.

I found very fascinating the fact that resolved data structures can be extracted from unstructured commercial documents full of noisy information.

Orion

Last edited by orion : 10-08-2004 at 11:12 AM.
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2004   #8
fathom
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 475
fathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the roughfathom is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by orion
Hi, Fathom.

Your observations are extremely important and well put.

I found this two statement the reason why a complete approach must be considered.



Ranking only or search stats only (Google, KW, WordTracker) are incomplete approaches to the process of on-topic keyword discovery. The first one is indeed second chair and the other can be indeed biased.

A complete approach as we presented, e.g. proper identification of optimum terms can be achieved.

I found very fascinating the fact that structured data structures can be extracted from unstructured commercial documents full of noisy information.

Orion
Amazingly we complement each other here. While the math & science of things makes it work, I prefer conceptual model overviews and how they can be adaptive to existing structures.

In plain language - I dabble in Math & Science!
fathom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #9
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

In our experiment, we asked for theme queries for two reasons:

(a) to start with theme terms that are strongly connected (c-index pre-qualified).
(b) if we have started with a single term, this would produce many possible thematic trees.

This is why we started with "mexican food" and not with "mexican" or why we started with "used cars" and not with "used", "forex trading" and not "forex", "email marketing" and not "email", etc. These were theme queries submitted by participant SEOs.

A search for "mexican" and subsequent analysis reveals that "Mexico" qualifies as a candidate optimum term. However, this is quite obvious. Constructing a query or topic for something like "Mexican Mexico" sounds redundant.


Now here is something I would like to share.

Someone emailed me asking about the difference between top and optimum terms. Sender allowed me to reproduce my own response at this thread. Here is the response.

"First, thank you for reading the paper and taking the time to contacting me."

"According to the paper's thesis, a top term is a term found at the top of occurrence probability lists that have been extracted from the top N ranked titles."

"An optimum term is a bit more complex to define. Let me define what is an optimum. This is defined as the best possible solution to a problem. Thus, what works for you may not work for others. It all depends on what you're trying to accomplish. According to the paper's thesis, an optimum term should be

1. relevant to searchers (as measured from searches-based Pi lists)
2. relevant to ranking algorithms (as measured from ranking-based Pi lists)
3. strongly connected (as measured with c-indices)
4. good (ROI) performer

This should not be taken for "The Definition". A term can be an optimum term in Google but not in MSN or Overture. Certainly we can add copy style, contextuality, geolocation targeting, and others things to the mix. Thus the above should be taken as a mere guide for terms selection."

"The main finding of the On-Topic Analysis paper is that is possible to extract well resolved data structures of the form top > broader > narrower ... from unstructured collections full of commercial noise.

Once we know which data structures are triggered by which queries in which databases, then we can target these structures according to a site development or marketing strategy. Note that discovery is accomplished client-side and without having to use classic IR methodologies that may work well under lab conditions but often fail on the commercial Web.

Moreover, we can quantify points 1, 2, and 3 with our software and doing so on-demand for others (but this is a topic I am pondering with others). Point 4, ROI, is something the marketer has to take care of. This is one of the reasons why the terms are called candidate optimum terms. I hope this help."


Orion

Last edited by orion : 10-08-2004 at 11:15 AM.
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #10
Phoenix
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 97
Phoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nice
Wow, excellent article Orion, been looking for some good scientifically based articles lately on these topics. Reading it now. Would be interesting to see how this applies to other themed terms.

Last edited by Phoenix : 10-08-2004 at 01:41 PM.
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #11
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Hi, Phoenix.

Thanks for such kind words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix
Would be interesting to see how this applies to other themed terms.
Any suggestion?

Orion
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #12
Nacho
 
Nacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: La Jolla, CA
Posts: 1,382
Nacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to behold
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orion
Once we know which data structures are triggered by which queries in which databases, then we can target these structures according to a site development or marketing strategy. Note that discovery is accomplished client-side and without having to use classic IR methodologies that may work well under lab conditions but often fail on the commercial Web.
I believe this is the key to making it all work and minimizing margin of error or increasing on-topic keyword generation.

When I look at Table 1. Data for Mexican Food and also look at my own search databases within MexGrocer.com for what users are trying to locate within the store eliminating the navigation method, I see that there are a number of high volume search queries that do not come up in your study or at least not in the top results. For example, here is our most recent list:
Searches / Query
930 mole
873 enchiladas
610 tamales
565 corn husks
514 tacos
501 mango
497 cheese
442 recipes
442 vanilla
440 chipotle
418 rice
406 carne asada
397 menudo
393 achiote
390 chocolate
390 guacamole
382 salsa
369 horchata
367 chorizo
351 pozole
Notice how "tortillas" or "burritos" do not come up in my top 20 internal search queries, but other words like mole, tamales, corn, guacamole, or salsa do come up. On the other hand, words like enchiladas, corn husks, tacos, mangos, cheese and others do very well in on-topic search demand. If we were to take some of these words and run a c-index ratio comparison.

First, the words used in "5.4.1 Visualization of Term Distances" and also on Table 1, but not MexGrocer.com's top 20 internal search queries.


Now the words "mole, tamales, corn, guacamole, or salsa" that appear on Table 1 and also on MexGrocer.com's top 20 internal search queries.


Now the words " enchiladas, corn husks, tacos, mangos, cheese" that DO NOT appear on Table 1, but do appear on MexGrocer.com's top 20 internal search queries.


Therefore, if we know a little more about "which data structures are triggered by which queries in which databases" then the on-topic analysis becomes even more valuable information for minimizing margin of error or increasing on-topic keyword generation.
Nacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #13
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Hi, Nacho

I got your email. We talk over the weekend. About your post. You are comparing two different things.

The tables you present are co-occurrence data, not search data or ranking data.

The example given in the tables and the other tables in the paper are based on Pi values from terms extracted from the top N ranked titles returned by a specific query, "mexican food". The stats you present in the post are from search logs. So, we cannot compare both lists. It is like comparing Google Keyword Tool Pi values with Pi values from the top N titles.

To associate your search logs with a data structure you would need to identify optimum terms. Then starting from the optimum terms construct the data structure for top, broader, narrower terms. Our software does this, precisely. This treatment, constructing data structures straight from optimum terms, was not discussed in the paper, which was aimed at presenting the basics of on-topic analysis.

The theme diagram Figure 1 and the term distances diagram shown in the paper are two different things. The theme diagram was to illustrate the architecture of a theme site. The tree diagram for term distances illustrate how term co-occurrence, indeed, generates a cluster of associations (similar PDQ_Med). There is no correlation between the two, except for the fact I use identical terms in the examples.

Orion

Last edited by orion : 10-08-2004 at 08:40 PM. Reason: I forget to add an important line at the beginning.
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #14
Nacho
 
Nacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: La Jolla, CA
Posts: 1,382
Nacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to behold
Orion, thank you very much for this clarification. Now I understand a lot better the differences. I'm learning a lot from your analysis.

I see that your software will be revolutionary and I know that most of us in the SEO industry will want to get a hold of it as soon as it is available. May I ask if there are any expected dates in mind for release?
Nacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #15
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

One more thing. Those tables you have posted, Nacho, are not mine, so that's not my copyrighted material. However, let me comment on the figures shown in those not-mine tables

You are mixing too broader terms with too narrower terms, which explain why you are getting too small c-indices when queried in FINDALL mode. Thus, correlations cannot be made.

Orion
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #16
Nacho
 
Nacho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: La Jolla, CA
Posts: 1,382
Nacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to beholdNacho is a splendid one to behold
So if I want learn how to swim, I need to jump in the water, right? . . . . . . sombody quick, throw in a lifesaver
Nacho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #17
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Hi, Nacho

I wish days have more than 24 hours as time is getting late, here in the Caribbean. Let me mention some few things. Here is one "salvavidas", amigo.

c-index calculations for three terms cannot be calculated with the c12-index equation. You would need to use the c123-index expression. See Appendix A.

So, your previous c12-index calculations need to be corrected.

However, to avoid the equation you can transform the 3-term case to a 2-term case by enclosing the mexican food phrase with quotes.

So for mexican food enchiladas, we get this results

k1="mexican food" n1=660000
k2=enchiladas n2=203000
k12="mexican food" enchiladas n12=23200

c12=27.63 ppt

See paper for the consequences of simplifying the 3-term case into a 2-term.

Take care, buddy.

Orion
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004   #18
Phoenix
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 97
Phoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nicePhoenix is just really nice
Orion,

Interesting thought I had that maybe you could clarify in regards to a comparision of two subject specific terms that seem related but are not. You mentioned in your study:

Quote:
The simplest way to qualify on-topic narrower terms consists in combining them with other on-topic narrower terms and checking their c-index values. This approach helps with the qualification of narrower terms and leads to the discovery of new on-topic narrower terms.
The terms I am referencing to are "cheese nachos" and "bean and cheese nachos". Now the terms look specific to their subject. But for the sake of the question. Cheese Nachos are a food item that is not considered "mexican food", while "bean cheese nachos" are. An uncle of mine is accredited with the man whose company put the food item "cheese nachos" in stadiums and sports games many years ago. I know that from this experience those are classified as a "concession foods". However if you go to a mexican restaurant you can get "bean and cheese nachos" something different. Its appears that in the Google Keyword Suggestion Tool, groups these two as the same thing, in a category such as "appetizers". It provides under "additional words" to consider such as "hors d oeuvres, bean dip, appetizers, nachos, old el paso".

Now my question is how can qualification of these narrower terms with the c-index result in a categorization of a board terms away from other broad terms "mexican food & concession food". It would appear that those broad terms would be better than "appetizer". Or would it? How is this done?
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2004   #19
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

I'm not sure I understand clearly the question. Could you refine it?

Orion
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2004   #20
orion
 
orion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,044
orion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to beholdorion is a splendid one to behold
Exclamation

Phoenix and Nacho I don't know if this will help a bit.

I'm currently researching the nature of query-triggered data structures. One of the methods for discovering relationships between narrower and broader terms consists in looking at two type of data structures; i.e. data structures extracted from

a. the immediate results (top 30 ranked titles)
b. the "bulk" (top 100, 200, 300, 400, 500...etc titles)

Profesor Filippo Menczer, from Indiana University, emailed me a good reference of his work today http://informatics.indiana.edu/fil/P...ikm-04-326.pdf We are going back and forth with research notes since we are in similar research areas.

His approach on topic term discovery is different to mine but, when we look at from which levels the data structures are triggered, we come with similar results, at least for the example he provided in the paper using the terms Mars, MOC, Exploration, and similar terms (see his paper).

My partial results follows (compare with his example in paper)


First 8 results from the top 30 titles

UNIQUE TERMS:60 TOTAL TERMS:102
N=30 QUERY:MOC
UNIQUE TERMS/N=2.00
TOTAL TERMS/N=3.40
Ri Pi (%) TERM i
1 13.73 MOC
2 5.88 MARS
3 4.90 IMAGE
4 4.90 MINISTRY
5 2.94 GLOBAL
6 2.94 SURVEYOR
7 1.96 ORBITER
8 1.96 CAMERA


First 8 results from the top 300 titles

UNIQUE TERMS:835 TOTAL TERMS:1427
N=300 QUERY:MOC
UNIQUE TERMS/N=2.78
TOTAL TERMS/N=4.76
Ri Pi (%) TERM i
1 12.12 MOC
2 1.12 MARS
3 0.98 NEWS
4 0.77 SHOES
5 0.77 MERRELL
6 0.70 GLOBAL
7 0.63 SERVICES
8 0.63 FREE

Lists of results for top 200-500 titles show similar data structure in the bulk. Compare with the data structure in the top 30 results.

On and on, this is only one method of discovering data structures relevant to a narrower term. Again, once we know which data strutures goes with which narrower term as triggered by which query, we can proceed and exploit the structure for any particular purpose (eg monetary gain, etc)


Hope this help


Orion

Last edited by orion : 10-12-2004 at 10:42 PM. Reason: typo
orion is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off