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Old 10-18-2005   #1
bhartzer
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Looksmart to be de-listed on Nasdaq

To be honest with you, I'm not totally surprised at this news. It looks like Looksmart will be de-listed on the Nasdaq stock exchange soon. Is this further proof of their inevitable downfall?

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/st...4170972&EDATE=

"LookSmart, Ltd. (Nasdaq:LOOK; ASX: LOK), an online media and technology company specializing in vertical search, today announced that on October 13, 2005 it received a letter from the Nasdaq staff stating that the Company has failed to comply with the $1.00 minimum bid price required for continued listing of its common stock on the Nasdaq National Market set forth in MarketPlace Rule 4450(a), and as a result the Company's common stock is subject to delisting."
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Old 10-18-2005   #2
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what happens if they get de-listed?
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Old 10-18-2005   #3
bhartzer
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I'm assuming that it will be business as usual for them. The only difference would be that they wouldn't be listed on Nasdaq.

Maybe someone with more stock exchange experience could elaborate on what it really means and what happens when a company get de-listed?
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Old 10-20-2005   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhartzer
Maybe someone with more stock exchange experience could elaborate on what it really means and what happens when a company get de-listed?
stocks that are not listed on one of the major exchanges trade over the counter, using some of the same underlying technologies that power Nasdaq http://www.otcbb.com/news/2005/Gener.../transfer2.stm

it's not a big deal as far as the company operations go to not be listed on a major exchange, but I think being listed adds a bunch of liquidity and trust to your stock... being backed by one of the major exchanges.

most stocks that are not on one of the major exchanges will not amount to anything... they are the ones you get emailed about all the time
http://www.spamstocktracker.com/

not that I have any real money, but I get regular mail investment spam now too. usually telecommunications or oil...

stocks can rebound though, but the reason Nasdaq would want to delist LookSmart is their stock not closing above $1 for the last 30 business days (although they have been in about a 6 month funk on that front)

most companies do splits that are 2:1 or 3:2 as companies grow, but during times of hyper enthusiasm & hyper growth stocks can become worth far more than they are when things go south. some of those companies do reverse splits to keep up their share value during the down time.

companies can do a reverse stock split to raise their per share value, ie: a 1:10 split would mean that for every 10 shares you owned you would now own 1 share.

when a stock splits either way it does not increase or decrease the value of the company, just the number of shares outstanding.

for a set market capitalization if a company has more shares then the per share value will be less.

if you look at telecommunications stocks like lucent, ciena, or jds uniphase you can see how the bubble bursting made $100+ stocks now $2 to $5

in September 2002 the meta search engine & mobile technology company InfoSpace did a 1:10 reverse split to stay listed on the Nasdaq, and has since grown quickly until disappointing in a few consecutive recent quarters

as a fair warning: I know nothing about the stock market but have been fascinated with markets and the psychology that drives them for nearly a decade and am one of the suckers that lost a bit (although it seemed like a lot to me) in the bubble 1.0.
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Last edited by seobook : 10-20-2005 at 01:53 AM.
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